Books I Like

Marianne's bookshelf: read

The Day Bailey Devlin's Ship Came In
it was amazing
Loved all three books! If you want a fun quick read, pick up all three Bailey Devlin’s.
tagged:
romance

The Day Baliey Devlin's Horoscope Came True
it was amazing
I always knew Rebecca Forster could write a funny novel if she really wanted to do so. It’s so nice to be right.
tagged:
romance

Exposing the Heiress
it was amazing
I enjoyed reading the whole Once a Marine series. Her Temporary Hero (book 2) was a Rita finalist, and I wouldn’t be surprised if Exposing the Heiress is a finalist as well. This book is a good read with a great heroine, a yummy hero and…
tagged:
romance

Caged Magic
it was amazing
Loved this book.
tagged:
romance




goodreads.com

Fall Foliage

We were in PA a few weeks ago for birthdays and a few book-signings. I brought my camera just in case we spotted some cool leaf colors. Sure enough, the trees in Cedar Beach Park put on a fine display, despite the eighty-degree weather. Just pretend you’re wearing a sweater when you look at them.

tree-4 tree-2

Once Upon a Time

 ouatStep through our castle doors into a world of imagination!

At long last, the Bethlehem Writers Group, known for its award-winning anthologies, has published a book especially for children. ONCE UPON A TIME is a collection of twenty-one sweet, funny, and yes, strange stories for kids from preschool through middle school.

This anthology is designed to grow with your child. First, stories such as “GG and Teddy and the Dream Willow” by Will Wright, “The Princess of Booray” by Emily P. W. Murphy, and “A Nutty Adventure” by Judith Mehl, will enchant those who enjoy being read to while sitting on a grown-up’s lap. Others, including “A Harmonious Secret” by Josie Myers, “Bird Boy” by Russell Uhler, and “Bring-Your-Monster-to-School Day” by Kidd Wadsworth, allow young readers to immerse themselves in the fantasy and adventure of reading on their own. Finally, for older kids, such stories as “Book Worm” by Christopher D. Ochs and “Coot” by Anne Hamilton complete the collection with the tween or early teen in mind.

Enjoy these and other entertaining stories from our award-winning authors including: Jeff Baird, Marianne H. Donley, Ralph Hieb, Diane Sismour, Paul Weidknecht, and Carol L. Wright. In addition, we are happy to present “Stick to the Bypathings,” an imaginative fantasy from Eleanor Ingbretson, the winner of the 2016 Bethlehem Writers Round- table Short Story Award. And charming illustrations from Agy Wilson enhance each story.

All together, this collection will captivate and delight children of all ages–even if they’re grownups!

“Once Upon a Time is a readable treat . . . the perfect book to snuggle up with before bedtime or share over milk and cookies. . . . [S]ure to delight both youngsters and the young at heart.” A. E. Decker, author of Moonfall Mayhem, the highly praised young adult fantasy series.

Purchasing information

Finalist Medal

thumbnail with medal editBreaking news!

Next Generation Indie Book Awards have awarded a finalist medal to the latest anthology from the Bethlehem Writers Group

A Readable Feast
Sweet, Funny, and Strange Tales for Every Taste
Paperback – $14.95
ISBN: 978-0-9892650-2-7
ASIN: B01M6VC40Z

Purchasing Infomation

Yearning for a tantalizing tale?

Whatever your taste, this collection of food-related stories from the multiple award-winning Bethlehem Writers Group has all the ingredients to satisfy your reading palate. Our menu includes twenty-seven appetizing stories, from light-fare and sides of fantasy to sweet romance and savory bites of mystery.

This anthology features my romantic short story, The Widow Next Door

Bon Appetit!

1467392188675-the-widow-next-door-how-had-he-missed-the-fire-department-arriving

A Readable Feast

A Readable Feast

Yearning for a tantalizing tale?

Whatever your taste, this collection of food-related stories from the multiple award-winning Bethlehem Writers Group has all the ingredients to satisfy your reading palate. Our menu includes twenty-seven appetizing stories, from light-fare and sides of fantasy to sweet romance and savory bites of mystery.

Jeff Baird’s “The Pickle Promenade” provides an amuse bouche. Try a spicy entree prepared by Diane Sismour in “Bump and Run.” Prefer a yarn with zing? Enjoy “Rightful Prey” by A. E. Decker. Jerry McFadden’s tart “Hard Times,” should tickle your taste buds. On the sweeter side, there’s Sally Paradysz’s “Our Town is Different” or the bittersweet “Breakfast for One” by Geoffrey Mehl.

Enjoy these and other delectable tales from our talented authors including: Courtney Annicchiarico, Terrie Daugherty, Bernadette De Courcey, Marianne H. Donley, Headley Hauser, Ralph Hieb, Judith Mehl, Emily P. W. Murphy, E. L. Ryan, Paul Weidknecht, and Carol L. Wright. To complete today’s specials, we offer tasty tales from Tracy Falenwolfe and C. A. Rowland, winners of Bethlehem Writers Roundtable’s Short Story Awards in 2014 and 2015 respectively. All honed their recipes to write sweet, funny, and strange stories to remember.

Bon Appetit!

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Keeper Shelf

Every room in my house, including all the bathrooms and the basement, has books. My mother and three sisters have similar decorating tastes.  A family acquaintance once commented, rather snidely, that it was like we lived in a library.  We didn’t keep her around long because who wouldn’t want to live in a library?

If you push me, I will admit to believing that heaven looks a lot like the Huntington Library; a lovely old mansion, seriously great books on the shelves, beautiful art on the walls all surrounded by a stunning garden.  Since it’s my heaven, I would include the chamber orchestra playing Mozart that happened to be performing the very first time I visited the Huntington Library, and a Starbucks -free, of course.

I love books.  I love the way they look.  I love the way they feel in my hands.  I love the way they smell –especially old books.

Not just novels, either, although I have tons of those. I also adore math books, especially geometry.   I’m mad about all sorts of children’s books from Pat the Bunny and The Spooky Old Tree to The Bridge to Terabithia and Nancy Drew.  And knitting books.  I have a collection of tiny old books, all about the size of my hand.

But, if I had to pick just three books for my keeper-shelf . . .

COLD SASSY TREE by Olive Ann BurnsCold Sassy Tree is the story of fourteen year old Will Tweedy, his Grandpa Rucker and Grandpa’s scandalous new wife, Miss Love all set in  turn-of-the-twentieth-century small town Georgia.  This book made me laugh out loud, Will Tweedy’s tall tale about his aunt inflatable bosom.  And cry until I couldn’t see to read, Grandpa Rucker and Will Tweedy lining Grandma’s grave with a blanket of roses.

 

 

 THE END OF ETERNITY by Isaac AsimovEnd_of_eternity

The End of Eternity is a love story.   I know. I know.  It’s science fiction.  But trust me, it is a love story.  Andrew Harlan is an Eternal whose job it is to “adjust” time for the greater good of humanity.   But every modification has a price –some people’s timelines are changed out of existence.   Harlan and other Eternals live in Eternity a place outside of time, so these adjustments have no consequences in their lives.  On one of his assignments Harlan meets and falls in love with Noÿs Lambent, who is not an Eternal.  If Harlan completes his modification of time, Noÿs will cease to exist.  Yet, if he saves her the resulting paradox will destroy all of Eternity.

 

 

Crocodile on the Sandbank THE CROCODILE ON THE SANDBANK by Elizabeth Peters

The Crocodile on the Sandbank is the first book in Elizabeth Peters’ Amelia Peabody mystery series.  Amelia Peabody is a forceful English Victorian spinster with a passion for Egypt, and cleaning, and issuing orders.  Her match is Radcliffe Emerson who has a passion for Egypt, issuing orders, and as it turns out Amelia.  (He doesn’t care so much about cleaning.)   This novel has everything I love about traditional mysteries.  The setting is historical. The POV is first person.  Peabody and Emerson are tons of fun.

So, if you had to pick three novels for your keeper shelf what would they be? 

Time Travel

Visiting another time, meeting Di Vinci, Mark Twain, or Archimedes sounds fun, on paper.   Yet, I’m not sure I would be so happy doing so in real life, especially those pops to the past – flush toilets, Starbucks, blow-dryers and antibiotics would be hard to give up.  But I enjoy the idea in fiction.

AWrinkleinTime[1]I started out time traveling young, about nine, by reading Madeleine L’Engle’s A WRINKLE IN TIME. I loved that book and probably read it five or six times in a row.  I was so taken with Meg, a GIRL, who was good at math, so good that she could help other children with their math homework. The time traveling part was just a side benefit.

Soon after I read PORTRAIT OF JENNIE by Robert Nathan, a haunting very short novel about an artist and a little girl who aged oddly.  THE TIME MACHINE by HG Wells followed and gave me nightmares for a week –Morlocks! My reading lists were rounded out by PEBBLE IN THE SKY and END OF ETERNITY both by Isaac Asimov.

But my very favorite time travel novel is THE MIRROR byMirror_[1] Marlys Millhiser. This novel is the story of Brandy and Shay –grandmother and granddaughter, who both look into an antique mirror on the eve of their weddings and switch places.  I’ve never read any of Marlys Millhisner’s other novels, but they look interesting.

Time Travel has been a fun plot device in lots of TV shows I’ve enjoyed over the years, from Sam and Darrin traveling to Salem in BEWITCHED, to the many episodes of STAR TREK, DR. WHO and of course QUANTUM LEAP.

BillandTed[1]

 

Movies are included in my time traveling adventures.  I love BACK TO THE FUTURE.  I’m laughing just typing the title for BILL AND TED’S EXCELLENT ADVENTURE.  A writing bubby and I dragged a gaggle of our kids and several of their friends to see this movie.  We sat several rows behind the kids laughing our heads off, while the kids, ranging in age of seven to thirteen, sat there looking blankly from the screen to their clearly nutty mothers.  I also enjoyed THE PHILADELPHIA EXPERIMENT.   The time travel movie I’ve enjoyed the most is the made for TV movie, THE GIRL, THE GOLD WATCH & EVERYTHING –which probably dates me more than BEWITCHED.

 

In searching for an image for THE GIRL, THE GOLD WATCH & EVERYTHING, I found out the

TheGirl[1]movie was first a novel by John D. MacDonald.  The same John D. MacDonald who wrote the Travis McGee hard boiled private detective novels.  I was stunned, and now I really want a copy of the novel to read.

I found other gems while looking on the Internet for time traveling tidbits.  Andy’s Anachronisms  is a website completely devoted to time travel in popular media.  I also found Time Travel Institute a website that discusses possible theories behind time travel.

one_with_the_darknessmd

 

I saved the best gem for last, a fellow OCC/RWA member, Susan Squires, who is an excellent writer and really nice person, has a series of time travel novels involving a time machine built by Da Vinci.  I hadn’t realized Susan was writing time travel because I’ve moved across the country and rarely attend meetings. But I know now and Susan’s books are on my To-Be- Read pile.  I can hardly wait to start them.

Do you have a favorite time travel novel, short story, TV show or movie?

Would you like to travel in time?  Where would you go?

Imaginary Erdős Number – Numberphile

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